Estate Planning In The Age Of Assisted Reproduction

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More and more couples are relying on assisted reproductive technology, ART, in order to have children.  One of the most frequently overlooked implications of this increase is how it affects estate planning. Anyone with children who were adopted, carried by a surrogate or conceived with ART needs to know the impacts this can have on their estate planning process.  Furthermore, the impact on estate planning runs even deeper and anyone who wants to enable the use of their genetic material after passing should also read further.

Defining a Child

If you had your child with any kind of assistive technology then there’s a possibility that they may not automatically inherit their share of your property.  That’s because the default definition of child may not incorporate anyone conceived with ART. In order to combat this and ensure that every member of your family gets what they deserve you can create definitions for different members of your family that include them by design.  You should extend these definitions not just to your own children but to any grandchildren, nieces or nephews. Failure to identify these heirs may lead to heartbreak.

Giving Your Genetic Material

When a young couple is planning to start a family the last thing they want to consider is the possibility that one of them may suffer an untimely death.  Unfortunately it’s always just that, a possibility. One of the most miraculous innovations in ART enables a young individual who faces this sudden tragedy to still conceive a child through the donation of the deceased’s reproductive material.  However, without meticulous estate planning, this possibility may be lost. That’s because the power of attorney is the one who decides what happens to genetic material after death. Unless an individual discusses it with them, they may believe it should be disposed of.

Of course, estate planning attorneys who aren’t on top of all the relevant cutting-edge advancements wouldn’t be able to take ART, or other innovations, into account.  That’s why it’s important to only work with the best estate planning attorneys and at Morgan Legal Group, that’s just what we are.  We offer the most advanced, personalized, committed service to help make sure your estate planning incorporates every recent technology.